Course Catalog » Course Listing for Radiation Oncology

140.01  Radiation Oncology Clerkship  (6 - 8 units)   Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Instructor(s): P. Sneed, S. Braunstein       Prerequisite(s): MEDICINE 110

Restrictions: None       Activities: Lecture, Clinical Clerkship

Mentored by residents and faculty, students will perform H&Ps on patients under evaluation for radiation therapy (mostly cancer patients), participate in clinics, attend teaching conferences, chart rounds, and tumor boards, and have the opportunity to observe a wide variety of radiotherapeutic approaches. Students have the option of giving a 20-60 minute presentation on a topic of their choice toward the end of the rotation.

140.02  Off-Campus Clerkship  (3 - 6 units)   Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Instructor(s): P. Sneed       Prerequisite(s): MEDICINE 110

Restrictions: None       Activities: Clinical Clerkship

Students will perform H&Ps on patients under evaluation for radiation therapy (mostly cancer patients), participate in clinics, attend teaching conferences, and have the opportunity to observe a variety of radiotherapeutic approaches.

150.01  Research in Radiation Oncology  (3 - 24 units)   Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Instructor(s): P. Sneed, S. Braunstein       Prerequisite(s): UCSF students only. Consent of faculty member in charge of students research project and approval of UME and coordinator.

Restrictions: UCSF students only.       Activities: Field Work, Laboratory, Project

Students participate in individual radiation oncology clinical or laboratory research under the close supervision of individual staff instructors.

235A  Radiation Therapy Physics I  (3 units)   Fall

Instructor(s): J. Cunha       Prerequisite(s): The course expects knowledge of radiation detection and measurement.

Restrictions: None       Activities: Lecture, Laboratory

The two quarters of this course series (235 A and B) cover the fundamentals of the physics of radiation therapy: the physics of radiation interactions relevant to radiation therapy, the machines that produce this radiation, the measurement of radiation quantities, and dose calculation. The physics of photon, electron, proton, and ion beams, brachytherapy, and hyperthermia are covered. Monte Carlo techniques are introduced as well as the basics of machine commissioning.

235B  Radiation Therapy Physics II  (3 units)   Winter

Instructor(s): J. Cunha       Prerequisite(s): 235A

Restrictions: None       Activities: Lecture, Laboratory

The two quarters of this course series (235 A and B) cover the fundamentals of the physics of radiation therapy: the physics of radiation interactions relevant to radiation therapy, the machines that produce this radiation, the measurement of radiation quantities, and dose calculation. The physics of photon, electron, proton, and ion beams, brachytherapy, and hyperthermia are covered. Monte Carlo techniques are introduced as well as the basics of machine commissioning.

235C  Clinical Rotation in Radiation Therapy Physics  (3 units)   Spring, Summer

Instructor(s): J. Cunha       Prerequisite(s): Radiation Oncology 235A and 235B

Restrictions: None       Activities: Clinical Experience/Patient Contact

This course will provide exposure to clinical medical physics activities commonly encountered in radiation oncology clinics. The student will rotate through various treatment modalities in the Radiation Oncology clinic to become familiar with medical physics procedures involved. The course will be divided into multi-week blocks. During each block the student will participate in clinical activities of a single service under the mentorship of one physics faculty.

460  Special Topics in Basic and Translational Medical Physics  (0.5 units)   Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Instructor(s): J. Cunha       Prerequisite(s): None. Completion of first year curriculum in Medical Physics or another experimental physics graduate program is helpful, but not essential.

Restrictions: None       Activities: Seminar

Each lecture/seminar offering will focus on the literature of a current important area of the physics of radiation oncology. Residents will be expected to read assigned papers critically before class and to present and discuss papers in class. These may include topics in Monte Carlo simulation, thermal therapy, treatment imaging, dose calculation / dose treatment planning, brachytherapy, external beam therapy. Each quarter will cover different topics to stay current with the field